Jackson Pollock on Art #17

Jackson Pollock Retrospective in Eighteen (18) Parts
Part #17

17-number-32-1950-jackson-pollock

Number 32 (1950) Jackson Pollock

“I’m very
representational
some of the time,
and a little
all of the time.

But when
you’re painting
out of your
unconscious,
figures
are bound
to emerge.”

~ ~ ~

“It
[abstract art]
should
be enjoyed
just as music
is enjoyed

after a while
you may
like it
or
you
may not.”

– Jackson Pollock

jackson-pollock-abstract-expressionism

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock

Jackson Pollock (January 28, 1912 – August 11, 1956) was an influential American painter and a major figure in the abstract expressionist movement. Pollock was best known for his unique style of drip painting, never making contact with the canvas. This method has inspired many to try to do their own ‘Pollock’, more to honor than to copy.

Pollock enjoyed considerable fame and was infamous for his notoriety. The major artist of his generation and a recluse, with an erratic personality. He was more than an alcoholic. I conjecture, he suffered from shifting moods. Hypothesis: he was always skating on the edge of bipolar. At least, that is the appearance. Knowing inside what happens outside, I would say the alcohol was a way of self-medicating to remove the haunting darkness.

In 1945, he married the artist Lee Krasner, who became his grounding force. She tried to go with what he needed but his temper was hurtful and cutting; and during his life while married to Krasner, the most difficult behavior for her to bear was his involvement with younger women. So when he wasn’t being a good husband and friend, he was like Greta Garbo, “I want to be alone” or I need to escape from everything. All the while, I would expect, he thought most about getting back to work while feeling he was always being pulled away from it. His soul needed to express what poured forth from the creative forces all around him. He needed to paint.

***In August 1949, Life Magazine ran a leading headline that invoked the question: “Jackson Pollock: Is he the greatest living painter in the United States?” Already famous in the New York art world, Pollock’s artistic reputation was widely known. He was American’s first “Art Star”—with his daring and radical style of painting continuing to change the path of modern art. Pollock was tormented. It plagued the artist throughout his life. I would estimate his tortured soul was driving him toward his obsessive need to paint, a way to express what communed with his soul. It helped orchestrate his wildly passionate innovative art—but still the darkness haunted him. He struggled with self-doubt; and became engaged in a lone battle between needing to express himself and shutting out the world. Pollock was in a downward spiral. It threatened to destroy the grounding his marriage provided with Lee Krasner, his gifted career, and ultimately his life. It ended with Pollock wanting to abandon the world in what appeared to be on a calm and clement summer night in 1956.

During one of his drunken episodes while out drinking with some young women, he was feeling wild inside while driving exceedingly fast, the top down. With a liquor bottle in one hand, he intentionally aimed his car off the road, crossing a field into what appeared to be a maze of trees. There was a crash. Pollock was killed. He was only 44. Cause of his death was declared to be an alcohol-related single-car accident when he was driving.

After Pollock’s death, there were retrospectives created by MoMA (Museum of Modern Art) and The Tate of London. One four months after his death in December 1956, and then some forty years later in 1998 and 1999. His paintings sell now in the nine figures, ex. $140,000,000 for one painting in a relatively recent acquisition. It’s amazing how artists reap the riches for the wealthy investor, whether they enjoy the works they purchase, it really is an investment to appreciate their already obscene fortunes. And we, as a government in the USA [the RePubs], deign to support the arts, wherever they should be found. How screwed up is that? Let the artist suffer. The art will be improved. The message is clear the artist, whether painter, poet, writer, film maker or other forms of art (there are so many forms in which to express art). It scares the shit out of those who think they are the power center. Power is their illusion. The artist, inside, sees the truth, even if it’s not always clarified in the beginning. Meaning grows with its filtering in the minds of those who can see or try to see. Eventually the light shines upon its ever changing interpretations of Truth. – j.kiley

Weekly Writing Prompt #77

Weekly Writing Challenge
Poetry and/or Flash Fiction
Feb 20th – #77

DOOR Template Instructions=====================

(5) Words:| MOON | ERA | SCENT | MARK | TEST |

*A brilliant idea has been brought to my attention regarding the (5) word prompt. Please feel free to substitute any of the words with a synonym.🎈 🎭 ✨

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Poetry Suggestions
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Haiku (5 – 7 – 5)
Tanka (5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7)
Shadorma (3 – 5 – 3 – 3 – 7 – 5)
6 lines – no rhymes – multiple stanzas [your choice] – just follow meter
Villanelle (19 line poem[no word limit]–2 repeating rhymes & 2 refrains)… Excellent example is Dylan Thomas’s “Do not go gentle into that good night”
Nonet (9 – 8 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1) progression downward of syllables
Cinquain (2 – 4 – 6 – 8 – 2) five-line poem on any theme – syllables
’28’ Form (4 x 7) or (7 x 4) lines & syllables or lines
Free Verse – No Limitations
See [POETRY PAGE] for further instructions

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Fictional Suggestions
====================

Flash Fiction (500 – 300 words)
Any Genre: Mystery – Sci-Fi – Fantasy – Horror – Literary

SUGGESTIONS FOR FLASH FICTION
***One main character
***Room for one scene
***Main conflict in first sentence
***Room for a single plot
***Room for a single, simple theme
***SHOW anything related to the main conflict
***TELL the backstory; don’t “show” it
***Save the twist until the end
***Eliminate all but essential words

Use your best judgement
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‘Let America Be America Again’

Let America Be America Again
Langston Hughes, 1902 – 1967

Let America be America again.
Let it be the dream it used to be.
Let it be the pioneer on the plain
Seeking a home where he himself is free.

(America never was America to me.)

Let America be the dream the dreamers dreamed—
Let it be that great strong land of love
Where never kings connive nor tyrants scheme
That any man be crushed by one above.

(It never was America to me.)

O, let my land be a land where Liberty
Is crowned with no false patriotic wreath,
But opportunity is real, and life is free,
Equality is in the air we breathe.

(There’s never been equality for me,
Nor freedom in this “homeland of the free.”)

Say, who are you that mumbles in the dark?
And who are you that draws your veil across the stars?

I am the poor white, fooled and pushed apart,
I am the Negro bearing slavery’s scars.
I am the red man driven from the land,
I am the immigrant clutching the hope I seek—
And finding only the same old stupid plan
Of dog eat dog, of mighty crush the weak.

I am the young man, full of strength and hope,
Tangled in that ancient endless chain
Of profit, power, gain, of grab the land!
Of grab the gold! Of grab the ways of satisfying need!
Of work the men! Of take the pay!
Of owning everything for one’s own greed!

I am the farmer, bondsman to the soil.
I am the worker sold to the machine.
I am the Negro, servant to you all.
I am the people, humble, hungry, mean—
Hungry yet today despite the dream.
Beaten yet today—O, Pioneers!
I am the man who never got ahead,
The poorest worker bartered through the years.

Yet I’m the one who dreamt our basic dream
In the Old World while still a serf of kings,
Who dreamt a dream so strong, so brave, so true,
That even yet its mighty daring sings
In every brick and stone, in every furrow turned
That’s made America the land it has become.
O, I’m the man who sailed those early seas
In search of what I meant to be my home—
For I’m the one who left dark Ireland’s shore,
And Poland’s plain, and England’s grassy lea,
And torn from Black Africa’s strand I came
To build a “homeland of the free.”

The free?

Who said the free? Not me?
Surely not me? The millions on relief today?
The millions shot down when we strike?
The millions who have nothing for our pay?
For all the dreams we’ve dreamed
And all the songs we’ve sung
And all the hopes we’ve held
And all the flags we’ve hung,
The millions who have nothing for our pay—
Except the dream that’s almost dead today.

O, let America be America again—
The land that never has been yet—
And yet must be—the land where every man is free.
The land that’s mine—the poor man’s, Indian’s, Negro’s, ME—
Who made America,
Whose sweat and blood, whose faith and pain,
Whose hand at the foundry, whose plow in the rain,
Must bring back our mighty dream again.

Sure, call me any ugly name you choose—
The steel of freedom does not stain.
From those who live like leeches on the people’s lives,
We must take back our land again,
America!

O, yes,
I say it plain,
America never was America to me,
And yet I swear this oath—
America will be!

Out of the rack and ruin of our gangster death,
The rape and rot of graft, and stealth, and lies,
We, the people, must redeem
The land, the mines, the plants, the rivers.
The mountains and the endless plain—
All, all the stretch of these great green states—
And make America again!

From The Collected Poems of Langston Hughes, published by Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. Copyright © 1994 the Estate of Langston Hughes. Used not for profit but to educate and share and for Black History Month [which should be Black History Year]

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes

Langston Hughes: A poet, novelist, fiction writer, and playwright, Langston Hughes is known for his insightful, colorful portrayals of black life in America from the twenties through the sixties and was important in shaping the artistic contributions of the Harlem Renaissance.

A Study In Tyranny

Would any of us . given the opportunity . go back in history . alter the future . using the future to determine what we would do would it change anything . actually changing the forward side of tomorrow . would it prove to be a greater future than exists at any given present?

A Study In Tyranny

Rating PG
Length 11m 46s

Genre . . . Fictional | Hypothetical | Question | Time Travel | Altering History

‘An unlikely assassin finds himself in turn of the century Vienna in order to kill Adolf Hitler.’

It is a different point in history. The film creates the dilemma of killing in the fashion of “Minority Report” | prevent a crime before it happens. Maybe a different knowledge would change the course of any person’s path.

Worth the time to watch. Ponder what your actions would be.
– j.kiley

Starring: Stephen Ellis and Matt Devine

Director: Andrew Laurich
Writers: Gabriel Miller & Andrew Laurich
Cinematography: Scott Uhlfelder
Producer: Natalie Sakai
Editor: Randall Maxwell
Sound: Lindsey Alvarez