Song Tribute | I’ll Stand By You | The Pretenders | Chrissie Hynde


I’ll Stand by You (LIVE In Concert) Chrissie Hynde

Oh, why you look so sad?
Tears are in your eyes
Come on and come to me now
Don’t be ashamed to cry
Let me see you through
’cause I’ve seen the dark side too
When the night falls on you
You don’t know what to do
Nothing you confess
Could make me love you less

I’ll stand by you
I’ll stand by you
Won’t let nobody hurt you
I’ll stand by you

So if you’re mad, get mad
Don’t hold it all inside
Come on and talk to me now
Hey, what you got to hide?
I get angry too
Well I’m a lot like you
When you’re standing at the crossroads
And don’t know which path to choose
Let me come along
’cause even if you’re wrong

I’ll stand by you
I’ll stand by you
Won’t let nobody hurt you
I’ll stand by you
Take me in, into your darkest hour
And I’ll never desert you
I’ll stand by you

And when…
When the night falls on you, baby
You’re feeling all alone
You won’t be on your own

I’ll stand by you
I’ll stand by you
Won’t let nobody hurt you

I’ll stand by you
Take me in, into your darkest hour
And I’ll never desert you
I’ll stand by you
I’ll stand by you
Won’t let nobody hurt you
I’ll stand by you
Won’t let nobody hurt you
I’ll stand by you………

* * * * * * *

“This song emotionally devours me…” – j.kiley ’17

Dedication is to someone special. She knows who she is & if she doesn’t I will let her know.

* * * * * * *

Haiku Review | How to Recount Your Dreams | a short film

HAIKU REVIEW CHALLENGE

The Challenge is to write a HAIKU REVIEW after watching the short film How to Recount Your Dreams . Feel free to write in Single – Couplet – Triplet Haiku Verses using 17 syllables per verse . Lines in 5-7-5 . Try to Review the short film below as close to your interpretation of what you viewed and how all your senses responded to it. Think of it as looking at a moveable painting.

If you decide to take on the HAIKU REVIEW CHALLENGE . Leave your Haiku in the Comment Section of this post on ‘the secret keeper’ . so others will be able to view what you have created. I will be posting my own HAIKU REVIEW just above the video of How to Recount Your Dreams.

If this film doesn’t inspire . don’t worry. A new short film will appear every Friday for you to try your skills at the WEEKLY HAIKU REVIEW CHALLENGE .

Here’s to engaging in the Haiku Review Challenge | Clinks & Cheers! – j.kiley

HEART TALES
by j.kiley

Dreams are chaos
Deeper tales unfold in heart
Sleep reveals story

© j.kiley ’17
Haiku

Best Viewing Experience Open Video Full Screen

How to Recount Your Dreams | Lazy Chief

We often wake up from a dream with a powerful urge to tell those around us about what happened. But our listeners are also liable to feel restless and bored during our narration of the dream. The issue takes us to the heart of the challenges of communication.

This animation was created in collaboration with Alain de Botton and the School of Life

Rating . . . PG
Genre . . . Narrative . Animation . Dreams . Storytelling
Length . . . 4m 20s

Director . . . Lazy Chief
Writer & Narrator . . . Alain de Botton

John Gardner On Life and Writing #24

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“Sanity in a writer is merely this: However stupid he may be in his private life, he never cheats in his writing. He never forgets that his audience is, at least ideally, as noble, generous, and tolerant as he is himself (or more so), and never forgets that he is writing about people, so that to turn characters to cartoons, or treat his characters as innately inferior to himself, to forget their reasons for being as they are, to treat them as brutes, is bad art. Sanity in a writer also involves taste . . . To write with taste, in the highest sense, is to write with the assumption that one out of a hundred people who read one’s work may be dying, or have loved someone dying; to write so that no one commits suicide, no one despairs; to write, as Shakespeare wrote, so that people understand, sympathize, see the universality of pain, and feel strengthened, if not directly encouraged to live on . . . If there is good to be said, the writer should remember to say it. If there is bad to be said, he should say it in a way that reflects the truth that, though we see the evil, we choose to continue among the living.” ― John Gardner, The Art of Fiction: Notes on Craft for Young Writers

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away.  –  j.kiley

Weekly Writing Prompt #102

Weekly Writing Challenge
Poetry and/or Flash Fiction
August 14th 2017 #102

DOOR Template Instructions=====================

(5) Words: | DRAGON | PROVIDE | HEART | FIELD | HAND |

*A brilliant idea has been brought to my attention regarding the (5) word prompt. Please feel free to substitute any of the words with a synonym.🎈 🎭 ✨

=====================
Poetry Suggestions
=====================

Haiku (5 – 7 – 5)
Tanka (5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7)
Shadorma (3 – 5 – 3 – 3 – 7 – 5)
6 lines – no rhymes – multiple stanzas [your choice] – just follow meter
Villanelle (19 line poem[no word limit]–2 repeating rhymes & 2 refrains)… Excellent example is Dylan Thomas’s “Do not go gentle into that good night”
Nonet (9 – 8 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1) progression downward of syllables
Cinquain (2 – 4 – 6 – 8 – 2) five-line poem on any theme – syllables
’28’ Form (4 x 7) or (7 x 4) lines & syllables or lines
Free Verse – No Limitations
See [POETRY PAGE] for further instructions

=====================
Fictional Suggestions
====================

Flash Fiction (500 – 300 words)
Any Genre: Mystery – Sci-Fi – Fantasy – Horror – Literary

SUGGESTIONS FOR FLASH FICTION
***One main character
***Room for one scene
***Main conflict in first sentence
***Room for a single plot
***Room for a single, simple theme
***SHOW anything related to the main conflict
***TELL the backstory; don’t “show” it
***Save the twist until the end
***Eliminate all but essential words

Use your best judgement
=====================

Proust: ‘The Muse Curses’

“Remembrance of Things Past”
August 13th 2017 | #111

THE MUSE CURSES

“All the products of one period have something in common; the artists who illustrate the poetry of their generation are the same artists who are employed by the big financial houses. And nothing reminds me so much of the monthly parts of Notre-Dame de Paris, and of various books by Gérard de Nerval, that used to hang outside the grocer’s door at Combray, than does, in its rectangular and flowery border, supported by recumbent river-gods, a ‘personal share’ in the Water Company.” ― Marcel Proust, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower

ghost of proust at grave