‘Silence of the Lambs’ director Jonathan Demme died at 73 | A Tribute

“I was really hooked on movies at a very young age. The Manchurian Candidate (1962), along with Seven Days in May (1964), Fail-Safe (1964) and Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964) were this quartet of anarchistic black-and-white American movies, each of which did things that you just didn’t do in American movies, especially in the realm of irreverence toward politics and government institutions and the Army. I was what, 16, it was shocking, it was thrilling and, interestingly, it predated my exposure to the French New Wave so, in a way, this was the American, a certain kind of new wave in American movies.” – Jonathan Demme

Jonathan Demme . Jodie Foster . Anthony Hopkins . All Oscars winners for top honors ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

“Your antagonist has to be every bit as formidable as your hero, or you diminish the character you’re supposed to care about. For people starting out writing scripts, they’re in that ‘hiss-the-villain’ mode, and you always want to say “Wait, wait, wait. They’re human too. Give them some problems and you’ll end up with a better story”. – Jonathan Demme

Anthony Hopkins (Hannibal Lector) ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ Jonathan Demme

“I don’t think it’s sacrilegious to remake any movie, including a good or even great movie. I think what’s sacrilegious is to make a bad movie, whether it’s a remake or an original. It’s what I always tell my actor friends, anybody who’s in this, this [business], you’ve gotta try to hold out and only do the scripts, do the material that offers you the opportunity to do your best work. Because if you do stuff that doesn’t give you that opportunity? Your work’s not gonna be good. And you’re gonna suffer in the long run from that. So I don’t care if it’s a remake if it’s a great script with parts in it that can attract fantastic actors, God, you know, to make the movie.” – Jonathan Demme

Masterful Film DVD Covers . All Titles Jonathan Demme Directed into Films

Jonathan Demme directed 8 different actors in Oscar-nominated performances: Mary Steenburgen, Jason Robards, Christine Lahti, Dean Stockwell, Anthony Hopkins, Jodie Foster, Tom Hanks, and Anne Hathaway. Steenburgen, Hopkins, Foster and Hanks won Oscars for their performances in one of Demme’s movies.

Anthony Hopkins (H.L.) ‘The Silence of the Lambs’ playing Jonathan Demme

Jonathan Demme and Michael Mann have both directed a Hannibal Lecter film and have also both been involved in a film about Howard Hughes. Mann directed Manhunter (1986) and produced The Aviator (2004), which he was originally to have directed. One of Demme’s earliest films was Melvin and Howard (1980), and he later went on to direct The Silence of the Lambs (1991).

Jodie Foster (Clarice Starling ) FBI trainee . Jonathan Demme ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

Trade Mark (Top 3)

Characters looking directly into the camera
Heavy use of steadicam interspersed with shots of handheld shots
Extreme close-ups on faces

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15 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know About ‘The Silence of the Lambs’

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Behind the Scenes – Silence of the Lambs
(Interviews with Jonathan Demme . Jodie Foster . Anthony Hopkins & Film Clips)

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Jonathan Demme was born on February 22, 1944 in Baldwin, Long Island, New York, USA as Robert Jonathan Demme. He was a director and producer, known for The Silence of the Lambs (1991), Philadelphia (1993) and The Manchurian Candidate (2004). He was married to Joanne Howard and Evelyn Purcell. He died on April 26, 2017 in New York.

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“R.I.P. I have always felt inspired by your work . the edge . the brilliant films . the depth . your love of the documentary . I love DOCS too . We will all miss you . who love and admire you . and what work we will never see you create . what you have given us makes you IMMORTAL . I once was afraid to watch The Silence of the Lambs . several psychotherapists suggested I do not . I waited years . one day I felt it was time . it scared the shit out of me . it freaked me out . no matter how often I watch it . it still freaks me out . it is cathartic though . I scream a lot at the screen . shouting non-sense or just #@$% words. I am moved by your intense view of the unexpected in life . the endings . the beginnings . the unfairness of it all sometimes . the insanity . but most of all THE STORY TELLING . oh what a wonderful chrysalis you have created  for us . thank you for all your marvelous and shocking gifts . this is my gift to you . Jonathan Demme .” – j.kiley ’17

Posted on ‘Expats Post‘ on 26th April 2017

John Gardner On Life and Writing #8

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

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john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover“An excellent plumber is infinitely more admirable than an incompetent philosopher. The society which scorns excellence in plumbing because plumbing is a humble activity, and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is an exalted activity, will have neither good plumbing nor good philosophy. Neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water. ”
– John Gardner

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

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john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away.  –  j.kiley

Weekly Writing Prompt #86

Weekly Writing Challenge
Poetry and/or Flash Fiction
Apr 24th – #86

DOOR Template Instructions=====================

(5) Words: | STRIKE | SCORE | RACE | TAKE | READ |

*A brilliant idea has been brought to my attention regarding the (5) word prompt. Please feel free to substitute any of the words with a synonym.🎈 🎭 ✨

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Poetry Suggestions
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Haiku (5 – 7 – 5)
Tanka (5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7)
Shadorma (3 – 5 – 3 – 3 – 7 – 5)
6 lines – no rhymes – multiple stanzas [your choice] – just follow meter
Villanelle (19 line poem[no word limit]–2 repeating rhymes & 2 refrains)… Excellent example is Dylan Thomas’s “Do not go gentle into that good night”
Nonet (9 – 8 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1) progression downward of syllables
Cinquain (2 – 4 – 6 – 8 – 2) five-line poem on any theme – syllables
’28’ Form (4 x 7) or (7 x 4) lines & syllables or lines
Free Verse – No Limitations
See [POETRY PAGE] for further instructions

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Fictional Suggestions
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Flash Fiction (500 – 300 words)
Any Genre: Mystery – Sci-Fi – Fantasy – Horror – Literary

SUGGESTIONS FOR FLASH FICTION
***One main character
***Room for one scene
***Main conflict in first sentence
***Room for a single plot
***Room for a single, simple theme
***SHOW anything related to the main conflict
***TELL the backstory; don’t “show” it
***Save the twist until the end
***Eliminate all but essential words

Use your best judgement
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Proust: ‘Regret’

“Remembrance of Things Past”
Apr 23rd Part #95

REGRET

“For, like desire, regret seeks not to be analysed but to be satisfied. When one begins to love, one spends one’s time, not in getting to know what one’s love really is, but in making it possible to meet next day. When one abandons love one seeks not to know one’s grief but to offer to her who is causing it that expression of it which seems to one the most moving. One says the things which one feels the need of saying, and which the other will not understand, one speaks for oneself alone. I wrote: ‘I had thought that it would not be possible. Alas, I see now that it is not so difficult.’ I said also: ‘I shall probably not see you again;’ I said it while I continued to avoid shewing a coldness which she might think affected, and the words, as I wrote them, made me weep because I felt that they expressed not what I should have liked to believe but what was probably going to happen.”
― Marcel Proust, In the Shadow of Young Girls in Flower

ghost of proust at grave

You Have The POWER

‘You Have The POWER’ © j.kiley ’17

Painting of Emily Dickinson – Unknown

We don’t even have to attribute Emily Dickinson’s lines anymore. She’s become one of the most poignant icons of our new century – a full-blooded renegade – rather than a reclusive spinster with red hair – or a helpless agoraphobic trapped in a room in her father’s house. – Jerome Charyn, The Secret Life of Emily Dickinson (passage not from his book)

It has been told – Emily once invited a young woman into her bedroom/writing room – pretended to lock the door with an invisible key. She stated: “This is Freedom.” Her room (quite like Virginia Woolf later writing the book ‘A Room of One’s Own’) is where she was able to be free to think. Her intellect far surpassed the men of her day – even though women were not given the freedom to do any in depth studying. She was born a natural Genius – overflowing in ideas coming out of her unimaginable depths of perception. – j.kiley ’17