Wild Horses | a short film | a haiku challenge

Feel drawn into the Haiku Challenge. Give it a go. If you write . share your Haiku in the comment section. j.k ❣🌈😃

SHARE THE DREAMS

Illness strikes the muse
Her challenge awake in dreams
Creates no limits

© j.kiley 2018

Following its young lead as she battles the frustrations of her illness of M.E. & frustration with her mother, she is becoming more and more obsessed with horses. She begins to write a story which brings her a feeling of joy & excitement. When you’re stuck in yourself . writing is one of the better forms to express yourself to the world. Stewart’s 26-minute film takes a very internal story and makes it relatable and accessible by injecting it with energy and humour.

Wild Horses by Rory Stewart

Rated . . . PG
Genre . . . Fantasy . Comedy . Illness
Length . . . 26m 12s

Cast:
Emma Curtis
Emma Cater
Ainslie Henderson
Stephanie Compton

Crew:
Written and Directed by Rory Alexander Stewart
Producer – Rebecca Smith
Cinematographer – Samira Oberberg

Official Selection:
– Cannes Film Festival – Cinefondation
– Encounters Short Film Festival
– Raindance (Nominated Best UK Short)
– British Short Film Festival Berlin (Nominated Best UK Short)
– Glasgow Short Film Festival
– Belgrade Auteur Fest
– Denver International Film Festival
and other…

Why You Shouldn’t Be an Artist | a short film | Haiku Review

Haiku Review Challenge

After watching the short film Why You Shouldn’t Be an Artist . If you take the Challenge . Write a HAIKU REVIEW leaving your Haiku in the Comment section of this post . Express the views you feel about the ‘Moveable Painting’ [as I like to refer to GREAT short films.]

If this short film doesn’t inspire . A new short will appear next Friday in our Weekly Haiku Review.

The way I write Haiku is using the 5-7-5 syllable combination . I also often write more than one verse. It is an option . not a rule. Enjoy the fun and creativity of 1st) viewing the short film . 2nd) looking for your Haiku and creating it 3rd) sharing it if you so desire.

Here’s to the Haiku Review Challenge
Cheers! – j.kiley

REASONS NOT WHY
by j.kiley

Talk the stop away
No child accepted No first
Voluntarily

© j.kiley ’17
Haiku

Best Viewing Experience Open Video Full Screen

Why You Shouldn’t Be an Artist | DSLRguide

Ratings . . . PG
Genre . . . Documentary . Narrative . Philosophical
Length . . . 2m 35s

No one said the artist’s creative life would be easy.
Host and Creator – Simon Cade

WEBSITE: dslrguide.tv
TWITTER: twitter.com/dslrguidance
INSTAGRAM: instagram.com/cadevisuals
CONTACT: simon@dslrguide.tv

John Gardner On Life and Writing #39

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“It is the nature of stupid people to hide their perplexity and attack what they cannot grasp.” ― John Gardner, On Becoming a Novelist

“My advice to you, my violent friend, is to seek out gold and sit on it.”
― John Gardner, Grendel

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley

John Gardner On Life and Writing #38

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“It is this experience of seeing something one has written come alive—literally, not metaphorically, a character or scene daemonically entering the world by its own strange power, so that the writer feels not the creator but only the instrument, or conjurer, the priest who stumbled onto the magic spell—it is this experience of tapping some magic source that makes the writer an addict, willing to give up almost anything for his art, and makes him, if he fails, such a miserable human being.” ― John Gardner, On Becoming a Novelist

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley

John Gardner On Life and Writing #37

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“Fiction, like sculpture or painting, begins with a rough sketch. One gets down the characters and their behavior any way one can, knowing the sentences will have to be revised, knowing the characters’ actions may change. It makes no difference how clumsy the sketch is—sketches are not supposed to be polished and elegant. All that matters is that, going over and over the sketch as if one had all eternity for finishing one’s story, one improves now this sentence, now that, noticing what changes the new sentences urge, and in the process one gets the characters and their behavior clearer in one’s head, gradually discovering deeper and deeper implications of the characters’ problems and hopes.”
― John Gardner, On Becoming a Novelist

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley

John Gardner On Life and Writing #36

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“Standing on an open hill, I imagine muffled footsteps overhead.”
― John Gardner, Grendel

“There is some realm where feelings become birds and dark sky, and spirit is more solid than stone.” ― John Gardner

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley

John Gardner On Life and Writing #35

Quote about John Gardner: “The late John Gardner once said that there are only two plots in all of literature. You go on a journey or a stranger comes to town. Since women, for many years, were denied the journey, they were left with only one plot in their lives — to await the stranger. Indeed, there is essentially no picaresque tradition among women novelists. While the latter part of the twentieth century has seen a change of tendency, women’s literature from Austen to Woolf is by and large a literature about waiting, usually for love.” ― Mary Morris, The Illustrated Virago Book of Women Travellers

***
john-gardner-on-writers-writing-cover

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover

“One of the reasons mature people stop learning is that they become less and less willing to risk failure.” ― John W. Gardner

“But dragons, my boy, have a whole different kind of mind.” ― John Gardner, Grendel (Dedicate the quotation on Dragons to My Partner . She’ll know what it means)

Quote about John Gardner: “It was [John Gardner’s] conviction that if the words in the story were blurred because of the author’s insensitivity, carelessness, or sentimentality, then the story suffered from a tremendous handicap. But there was something even worse and something that must be avoided at all costs: if the words and the sentiments were dishonest, the author was faking it, writing about things he didn’t care about or believe in, then nobody could ever care anything about it.” ― Raymond Carver, Call If You Need Me: The Uncollected Fiction and Other Prose

***

john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism such as On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley