S~U~R | a short film

“S~U~R is an experimental film that was produced during the last months aside our daily projects.

When working on it we were offered a great creative freedom that provided the chance of refining our skills towards new technologies.

Your main goal was to create an aesthetic visual language which should build a dreamlike atmosphere.” Andreas Barden

A sensual stimulation of visual changes. Enjoyable to the psyche and the eyes. It’s short and pleasantly surprising. – j.kiley

S~U~R from Andreas Barden

The Night the Moon Fell | a short film

All I can possibly say is what a huge surprise from such a short film of 2m 40s. I could add it is animated and about a young boy with a telescope who is awaiting Santa Claus to arrive. From here on if more is sought out from the story – it is better to watch the video. – j.kiley

FOR FULLER EXPERIENCE I RECOMMEND OPENING TO FULL SCREEN
WITH THE VOLUME UP AT YOUR OWN ACCEPTABLE LEVEL

The Night the Moon Fell

Rated . . . PG (Content)
Genre . . . Sci-Fi | Supernatural
Length . . . 2m 40s

A short animated film about a curious boy.
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Created by . . . John Bashyam (johnbashyam.com)
Produced by . . . Tom Leach (mediared.tv)
CG Supervisor . . . Justin Denton (justindenton.com)
Original Music . . . James Craft
Sound Design . . . Taylor Blaine
Timmy’s Mom . . . Anisha Karur
Additional Animation . . . Hunter Gibson
Concept Art . . . Julia VanderPoel
Character Concepts . . . Julian Kay
Additional Textures . . . Julia VanderPoel, Andre Soschinski
Bedroom Wallpaper Art . . . Sera Holland (handmadebymeblog.com)
Bedroom Poster Art . . . Benjamin Garner, Moustafa Khamis
Additional Models . . . Andre Soschinski, Giancarlo Vollucci, videocopilot.net, turbosquid.com, evermotion.com
End Metal Song . . . Baring Teeth for Revolt by Goatwhore
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“After debuting at Raindance, Cinequest, and being featured on Funny or Die, I’ve decided to put the film online. Hope you all enjoy!”

Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity – Part Six

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

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There is ecstasy in paying attention. You can get into a kind of Wordsworthian openness to the world, where you see in everything the essence of holiness. . .

If you give freely, there will always be more. … It is one of the greatest feelings known to humans, the feeling of being the host, of hosting people, of being the person to whom they come for food and drink and company. This is what the writer has to offer.

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Writing and reading decrease our sense of isolation. They deepen and widen and expand our sense of life: they feed the soul. When writers make us shake our heads with the exactness of their prose and their truths, and even make us laugh about ourselves or life, our buoyancy is restored. We are given a shot at dancing with, or at least clapping along with, the absurdity of life, instead of being squashed by it over and over again. It’s like singing on a boat during a terrible storm at sea. You can’t stop the raging storm, but singing can change the hearts and spirits of the people who are together on that ship.

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Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity – Part Five

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

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As we live, we begin to discover what helps in life and what hurts, and our characters act this out dramatically. This is moral material. … A moral position is a passionate caring inside you. We are all in danger now and have a new everything to face, and there is no point

gathering an audience and demanding its attention unless you have something to say that is important and constructive. My friend Carpenter says we no longer need Chicken Little to tell us the sky is falling, because it already has. The issue now is how to take care of one another.

What Carl Sagan found in science — profound awe, deep reverence, a source of spiritual elevation.

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In order to be a writer, you have to learn to be reverent. If not, why are you writing? Why are you here? … Think of reverence as awe, as presence in and openness to the world. Think of those times when you’ve read prose or poetry that is presented in such a way that you have a fleeting sense of being startled by beauty or insight, by a glimpse into someone’s soul. All of a sudden everything seems to fit together or at least to have some meaning for a moment. This is our goal as writers, I think; to help others have this sense of — please forgive me — wonder, of seeing things anew, things that can catch us off guard, that break in on our small, bordered worlds. When this happens, everything feels more spacious.

[…]

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Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity – Part Four

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

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Perfectionism is a mean, frozen form of idealism, while messes are the artist’s true friend. What people somehow (inadvertently, I’m sure) forgot to mention when we were children was that we need to make messes in order to find out who we are and why we are here — and, by extension, what we’re supposed to be writing.

Susan Sontag “That’s what a writer does — a writer pays attention to the world.”

Writing is about learning to pay attention and to communicate what is going on.

[…

The writer is a person who is standing apart, like the cheese in “The Farmer in the Dell” standing there alone but deciding to take a few notes. You’re outside, but you can see things up close through your

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binoculars. Your job is to present clearly your viewpoint, your line of vision. Your job is to see people as they really are, and to do this, you have to know who you are in the most compassionate possible sense. Then you can recognize others.

To be a good writer, you not only have to write a great deal but you have to care. You do not have to have a complicated moral philosophy. But a writer always tries, I think, to be a part of the solution, to understand a little about life and to pass this on.
George Eliot famously observed, “What do we live for, if it is not to make life less difficult for each other?”

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Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity – Part Three

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

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Hope, as Chesterton said, is the power of being cheerful in circumstances that we know to be desperate. Writing can be a pretty desperate endeavor, because it is about some of our deepest needs: our need to be visible, to be heard, our need to make sense of our lives, to wake up and grow and belong.

At the heart of writing, lies a capacity for quiet grit and a willingness to decondition the all too human tendency to get so overwhelmed by the enormity of the journey that we’re too paralyzed to take the first step.

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Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write, which was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my brother’s shoulder, and said, “Bird by bird, buddy. Just take it bird by bird.”

Neil Gaiman famously advised, “Perfection is like chasing the horizon. Keep moving.”

David Foster Wallace admonished, “If your fidelity to perfectionism is too high, you never do anything.”

Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life, and it is the main obstacle between you and a shitty first draft.

[…]

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Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity – Part Two

Bird by Bird: Anne Lamott’s Timeless Advice on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

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I tell my students that the odds of their getting published and of it bringing them financial security, peace of mind, and even joy are probably not that great. Ruin, hysteria, bad skin, unsightly tics, ugly financial problems, maybe; but probably not peace of mind. I tell them that I think they ought to write anyway.

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My writer friends, and they are legion, do not go around beaming with quiet feelings of contentment. Most of them go around with haunted, abused, surprised looks on their faces, like lab dogs on whom very personal deodorant sprays have been tested.

But I also tell [my students] that sometimes when my writer friends are working, they feel better and more alive than they do at any other time. And sometimes when they are writing well, they feel that they are living up to something. It is as if the right words, the true words, are already inside them, and they just want to help them get out. Writing this way is a little like milking a cow: the milk is so rich and delicious, and the cow is so glad you did it.

Good writing is about telling the truth. We are a species that needs and wants to understand who we are.

[…]

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