Ocean’s 8 | movie trailer


Ocean’s 8

Danny Ocean’s estranged sister Debbie (Sandra Bullock) attempts to pull off the heist of the century at New York City’s star-studded annual Met Gala. Her first stop is to assemble the perfect all-female crew: Lou, Rose, Daphne Kluger, Nine Ball, Tammy, Amita, and Constance.

Rating . . . PG-13 . Language . Drug Use . Some Suggestive Comments
Genre . . . Action . Comedy . Crime
Length . . . 1h 50m

Released (USA) . . . 8th June 2018

Director . . . Gary Ross (The Hunger Games)
Writers . . . Gary Ross & Olivia Milch

Stars . . .
Sandra Bullock . . . Debbie Ocean
Cate Blanchett . . . Lou
Anne Hathaway . . . Daphne Kluger
Sarah Paulson . . . Tammy

The cast is extensive . . .

John Gardner | On Becoming a Novelist | #30

john-gardner-on-becoming-a-novelist-cover
“In writing short stories—as in writing novels—take one thing at a time. (For some writers, this advice I’m giving may apply best to a first draft; for others, it may hinder the flow at first but be useful when time for revision comes.) Treat a short passage of description as a complete unit and make that one small unit as perfect as you can; then turn to the next unit—a passage of dialogue, say—and make that as perfect as you can. Move to larger units, the individual scenes that together make up the plot, and work each scene until it sparkles.” ― John Gardner
john-gardner-1933-1982
John Gardner (1933–1982) was born in Batavia, New York. His critically acclaimed books include the novels Grendel, The Sunlight Dialogues, and October Light, for which he received the National Book Critics Circle Award, as well as several works of nonfiction and criticism . including . On Becoming a Novelist. He was also a professor of medieval literature and a pioneering creative writing teacher whose students included Raymond Carver and Charles Johnson. When I worked at Bennington College in Southern VT I would often see him walking across the campus during the Summer Writing Workshops. Or when his white hair was flowing as he rode his beloved motorcycle on campus or away. – j.kiley

Weekly Writing Prompt #147

Weekly Writing Challenge #147
Poetry and/or Flash Fiction

(5) Words: | NUMB | MOTION | FAME | RULES | SMASH |

*A brilliant idea has been brought to my attention regarding the (5) word prompt. Please feel free to substitute any of the words with a synonym.🎈 🎭 ✨

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Poetry Suggestions
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Haiku (5 – 7 – 5)
Tanka (5 – 7 – 5 – 7 – 7)
Shadorma (3 – 5 – 3 – 3 – 7 – 5)
6 lines – no rhymes – multiple stanzas [your choice] – just follow meter
Villanelle (19 line poem[no word limit]–2 repeating rhymes & 2 refrains)… Excellent example is Dylan Thomas’s “Do not go gentle into that good night”
Nonet (9 – 8 – 7 – 6 – 5 – 4 – 3 – 2 – 1) progression downward of syllables
Cinquain (2 – 4 – 6 – 8 – 2) five-line poem on any theme – syllables
’28’ Form (4 x 7) or (7 x 4) lines & syllables or lines
Free Verse – No Limitations
See [POETRY PAGE] for further instructions

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Fictional Suggestions
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Flash Fiction (500 – 300 words)
Any Genre: Mystery – Sci-Fi – Fantasy – Horror – Literary

SUGGESTIONS FOR FLASH FICTION
***One main character
***Room for one scene
***Main conflict in first sentence
***Room for a single plot
***Room for a single, simple theme
***SHOW anything related to the main conflict
***TELL the backstory; don’t “show” it
***Save the twist until the end
***Eliminate all but essential words

Use your best judgement
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Proust: Is It Really Like That | Remembrance of Things Pass #155

IS IT REALLY LIKE THAT

“It seemed to me, that they would not be ‘my’ readers but readers of their own selves, my book being merely a sort of magnifying glass like those which the optician at Combray used to offer his customers—it would be my book but with it I would furnish them the means of reading what lay inside themselves. So that I would not ask them to praise me or to censure me, but simply to tell me whether ‘it really is like that.’ Whether the words that they read within themselves are the same as those which I have written.” ― Marcel Proust

ghost of proust at grave