a desperate heart

a desperate heart
written by jennifer kiley
©transgraphics by j. kiley
created 02.11.13
posted 02.11.13

papillons sont libres par j. kiley © jennifer kiley 2013

a desperate heart

“…relentless inquisitors rose from a desperate heart…”
passage from the metaphysical & magical realism novel
Orange Petals in a Storm
Author: Dr. Niamh Clune
http://ontheplumtree.wordpress.com

[youtube=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-IIOKD8k-k&w=670&h=407]
Philip Glass–The Hours

“Let go of certainty. The opposite isn’t uncertainty. It’s openness, curiosity and a willingness to embrace paradox, rather than choose up sides. The ultimate challenge is to accept ourselves exactly as we are, but never stop trying to learn and grow.” ― Tony Schwartz

“As adults, we have many inhibitions against crying. We feel it is an expression of weakness, or femininity or of childishness. The person who is afraid to cry is afraid of pleasure. This is because the person who is afraid to cry holds himself together rigidly so that he won’t cry; that is, the rigid person is as afraid of pleasure as he is afraid to cry. In a situation of pleasure he will become anxious. As his tensions relax he will begin to tremble and shake, and he will attempt to control this trembling so as not to break down in tears. His anxiety is nothing more than the conflict between his desire to let go and his fear of letting go. This conflict will arise whenever the pleasure is strong enough to threaten his rigidity. Since rigidity develops as a means to block out painful sensations, the release of rigidity or the restoration of the natural motility of the body will bring these painful sensations to the fore. Somewhere in his unconscious the neurotic individual is aware that pleasure can evoke the repressed ghosts of the past. It could be that such a situation is responsible for the adage “No pleasure without pain.” — Alexander Lowen, The Voice of the Body

“Quitting is not giving up, it’s choosing to focus your attention on something more important. Quitting is not losing confidence, it’s realizing that there are more valuable ways you can spend your time. Quitting is not making excuses, it’s learning to be more productive, efficient and effective instead. Quitting is letting go of things (or people) that are sucking the life out of you so you can do more things that will bring you strength.”― Osayi Osar-Emokpae, Impossible Is Stupid

“Creativity is a kind of letting go.” ― Brandon A. Trean

3 thoughts on “a desperate heart

  1. “As adults, we have many inhibitions against crying. We feel it is an expression of weakness, or femininity or of childishness. The person who is afraid to cry is afraid of pleasure. This is because the person who is afraid to cry holds himself together rigidly so that he won’t cry; that is, the rigid person is as afraid of pleasure as he is afraid to cry. In a situation of pleasure he will become anxious. As his tensions relax he will begin to tremble and shake, and he will attempt to control this trembling so as not to break down in tears. His anxiety is nothing more than the conflict between his desire to let go and his fear of letting go. This conflict will arise whenever the pleasure is strong enough to threaten his rigidity. Since rigidity develops as a means to block out painful sensations, the release of rigidity or the restoration of the natural motility of the body will bring these painful sensations to the fore. Somewhere in his unconscious the neurotic individual is aware that pleasure can evoke the repressed ghosts of the past. It could be that such a situation is responsible for the adage “No pleasure without pain.” — Alexander Lowen, The Voice of the Body

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    • You are so welcome, Niamh…your endearing words mean a great deal to me. What you have written about the “ole thoughtforms” are unfortunately more true than one would want them to be. Stress and not feeling secure awaken the nightmares from the unconscious elevating them to the surface and bring a severe haunting down on one’s mind.

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